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Hawaiian Kingdom Treaty

TREATY OF RECIPROCITY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE HAWAIIAN KINGDOM

Ratified by the Hawaiian Islands April 17, 1875
Ratified by the President of the United States, with amendments, May 31, 1875
Ratifications exchanged at Washington, June 3, 1875
Entered into force September 9, 1876
Supplemented by Convention of December 6, 1884

The United States of Americas and his Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands, equally animated by the desire to strengthen and perpetuate the friendly relations which have heretofore uniformly existed between them, and to consolidate their commercial intercourse, have resolved to enter into a Convention for Commercial Reciprocity. For this purpose, the President of the United States has conferred full powers on Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State, and His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands has conferred like powers on Honorable Elisha H. Allen, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Chancellor of the Kingdom, member of the Privy Council of State, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipontentiary to the United States of America, and Honorable Henry A. P. Carter, member of the Privy Council of State, His Majesty' s special Commissioner to the United States of America.

And the said Plenipotentiaries, after having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in due form, have agreed to the following articles:

ARTICLE I

For and in consideration of the right and privileges granted by His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands in the next succeeding article of this Convention, and as an equivalent therefor, the United States of America hereby agree to admit all the articles named in the following schedule, the same being the growth and manufacture or produce of the Hawaiian Islands, into all the ports of the United States free of duty.

SCHEDULE

Arrow-root, castor oil, bananas, nuts, vegetables, dried and undried, preserved and unpreserved; hides and skins, undressed; rice; pulu; seeds; plants, shrubs, or tree; muscovado, brown, and all other unrefined sugar, meaning hereby the grade of sugar heretofore commonly imported from the Hawaiian Islands, and now known in the markets of San Francisco and Portland a " Sandwich Island Sugar ;" syrups of sugar-cane, melado, and molasses; tallow.

ARTICLE II

For and in consideration of the right and privilege granted by the United States of America in the preceding article of this Convention, and as an equivalent therefor, His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands hereby agrees to admit all the articles named in the following schedule, the same being the growth, manufacture, or produce of the United States of America, into all the ports of the Hawaiian Islands free of duty.

SCHEDULE

Agricultural implements; animals; beef, bacon, pork, ham, and all fresh, smoked, or preserved meat; boots and shoes; grain, flour, meal, and bran. Bread and breadstuff, of all kinds; bricks, lime, and cement; butter, cheese, lard, tallow; bullion; coal; cordage, naval stores, including tar, pitch, resin, turpentine raw and rectified; copper and composition sheating; nails and bolts; cotton and manufactures of cotton, bleached and unbleached, and whether or not colored, stained, painted, or printed; eggs; fish and oysters, and all other creatures living in the water, and the produce thereof; fruits, nuts, and vegetables, green, dried, or undried, preserved or unpreserved; hardware; hides, furs, skins and pelts, dressed or undressed; hoop iron and rivets, nails, spikes and bolts, sacks, brads, or sprigs; ice; iron and steel and manufactures thereof; leather; lumber and timber of all kinds, round, hewed, sawed and unmanufactured, in hole or in part; doors, sashes, and blinds; machinery of all kinds, engines and parts thereof; oats and hay; paper, stationary, and books, and all manufactures of paper or paper and wood; petroleum and all oils for lubricating or illuminating purposes; plants shrubs, trees, and seeds; rice; sugar, refined or unrefined; salt; soap; shooks, staves, and headings; wool and manufactures of wool, other than read-made clothing; wagons and carts for the purposes of agriculture or of dryage; wood and manufacture of wood, or of wood and metal, except furniture either upholstered or carved, and carriages; textile manufactures made of a combination of wool, cotton, silk, or linen, or of any two or more of them other than when ready-made clothing; harness and all manufactures of leather; starch; and tobacco, whether in leaf or manufactured.

ARTICLE III

The evidence that articles proposed to be admitted into the ports of the United States of America, or the ports of the Hawaiian Islands, free of duty, under the first and second articles of this Convention, are the growth, manufacture, or produce of the United States of America or of the Hawaiian Islands, respectively, shall be established under such rules and regulations and conditions for the protection of the revenue as the two Governments may from time to time respectively prescribe.

ARTICLE IV

No export duty or charges shall be imposed in the Hawaiian Islands, or in the United States, upon any of the articles proposed to be admitted into the ports of the United States or the ports of the Hawaiian Islands free of duty under the first and second articles of this Convention. It is agreed, on the part of His Hawaiian Majesty, that, so long as this Treaty shall remain in force, he will not lease or otherwise dispose of or create any lien upon any port, harbor, or other territory in his dominions, or grant so special privilege or right of use therein, to any other power, state, or government, nor make any treaty by which any other nation shall obtain the same privileges, relative to the admission of any articles free of duty hereby secured to the United States.

ARTICLE V

The present Convention shall take effect as soon as it shall have been approved and proclaimed by His Majesty the King of the Hawaiian Islands, and shall have been ratified and duly proclaimed on the part of the government of the United States, but not until a law to carry it into operation shall have been passed by the Congress of the United States of America. Such assent having been given and the ratifications of the Convention having been exchanged provided in Article I., this CConventionshall remain in force for seven years from the date at which it may come. into operation; and further, until the expiration of twelve months after either of the contracting parties shall give notice to the other of its wish to terminate the same; each of the high contracting parties being at liberty to give such notice to the other at the end of the said term of seven years, or at an time thereafter.

ARTICLE VI

The present Convention shall be duly ratified and the ratification exchanged at Washington City, within eighteen months from the date hereof, or earlier if possible.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries of the high contracting parties have signed this present Convention, and have affixed thereto their respective seal.

Done in duplicate, at Washington, the thirteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five.

      HAMILTON FISH
      ELISHA H. ALLEN
      HENRY A.P. CARTER

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